10 thoughts on “Wordless Wednesday: Comfy?

  1. Whenever I observe anxiety in the facial expression of my aging mother, a typical senior, I can also witness how that stress suddenly drains and is replaced with joyful adoration upon her cat entering the room: “Hi, sweetheart,” she’ll say. I know that countless other seniors with pets also experience the emotional benefits of their animals’ presence. (Of course, the animals’ qualities, especially an un-humanly innocence, makes losing that pet someday such a heartbreaking experience.)

    Many of us can appreciate the reciprocally healthy — perhaps even somewhat symbiotic — relationships that can exist between pet cats and their loving and appreciative human hosts, especially physically and/or mentally ill hosts. They have a beneficial influence over humanity that many people still cannot fathom; and this beautiful reality of their positive effect on their human hosts can also be beneficial to the animals themselves.

    Yet, there seems to be a prevailing mentality out there of feline disposability; a subconscious human perception that the worth of such animal life (if not even human life in regularly war-torn or overpopulated famine-stricken global regions) is measured by its overabundance and the protracted conditions under which it suffers. I feel that only when over-populations of unwanted cats are greatly reduced in number by responsible owners consistently spaying/neutering their felines, will their presence be truly appreciated, especially for the symbiotic-like healthy relationships they offer their loving owners.

    Feral cat Trap/Neuter/Release programs are typically underfunded by governments and private donors, regardless of their documented success in reducing the needless great suffering by these beautiful animals. A few years ago, it was reported that nearby Surrey (B.C.) had/has approximately 36,000 feral cats, very many of which suffer severe malnourishment, debilitating injury and/or infection by callously neglectful municipal government as well as individual residents who choose to remain silent. When I made a monetary donation to the local Trap/Neuter/Release (TNR) program, a lady volunteer left me a tearful voice mail expressing her appreciation, which to me suggested a scarcity of caring financial donors.

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